A play written in the 1980’s about the lack of employment and prospects for young people on Tyneside is coming to Newcastle and the theatre company performing it are looking to give real opportunities to teenagers in the region.

Blowin’ a Hooley will be bringing Tom Hadaway’s classic play The Filleting Machine to Alphabetti Theatre in Newcastle from 28 – 30 November. The dates are the only chance for Newcastle audiences to see the play in the city.

Set on The Ridges Estate (now Meadow Well Estate) in the 1980s, the play centres around the Rutter family and their dependency on the father’s job at North Shields fish quay and the introduction of new technology that could jeopardise their livelihood.

Director Catherine Scott said, “Despite the fact it was written over thirty years ago, the play explores issues that are still relevant today. One of them is about opportunities for young people and we are delighted to have been able to employ two young actors to play the parts of the teenagers in the family.”
Blowin’ a Hooley are also dedicated to helping support other aspiring young people too. They are looking for young people aged 13 to 18 within North Tyneside to take part in a special Christmas show.

The young people don’t have to have any previous acting experience but must have an interest in drama. The sessions will run at The Cedarwood Trust, Avon Avenue on the Meadow Well Estate on Monday evenings. Performances will be at the end of term for family, friends and the general public with plays being created by the groups themselves, supported by the professional writers and actors that make up Blowin’ a Hooley Theatre.

Blowin’ a Hooley themselves had a helping hand into the theatrical business when The Sunday for Sammy Trust, a North East based charity that funds performing artistes from the region at the outset of their careers, gave them a grant to fund the production. Since then, Arts Council England National Lottery funding has been awarded to promote audience engagement in areas where people wouldn’t normally go to the theatre.

“We’re all about giving access to theatre for all members of the community no matter where you live or what your background is. We’re looking forward to playing Alphabetti Theatre and engaging with the very people that Tom Hadaway created the play for – real Geordies,” said Catherine.

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