Youngsters at Abingdon Primary School & Children’s Centre are really enjoying their ‘rubbish’ lunchtime play sessions, thanks to recycling specialists Scott Bros.

For the pupils are adapting a host of recycled materials donated by Scott Bros to create their own mini adventure playgrounds, dens, and sculptures – which is breaking down language barriers and helping them develop interactive skills.

Director Peter Scott said: “As a family-run company specialising in recycling, it’s always fantastic to be able to find a new and constructive use for materials – which, in this case is creating some joy and putting a big smile on these children’s faces!

“We also hope it will help educate the next generation on the many benefits of recycling.”

The Middlesbrough school is part of a network of more than 300 primary and secondary ‘Schools of Sanctuary’ committed to supporting young people seeking sanctuary in the UK.

The school has grown from 450 pupils to 600 over the past two years, with more than 40 different languages spoken and 91 percent of children speaking English as an additional language.

Keith Smith, the school’s behaviour, and wellbeing lead, said that play, creativity, and fun is a universal language which unites those from diverse countries and cultures.

The school had previously amassed a collection of materials, ranging from planks, tarpaulins, pallets, and tyres, all of which had to be disposed of due to precautions surrounding the spread of Covid-19.

“These donated items really encourage the children to get involved. These are pupils who may not be able to speak each other’s languages, but they communicate and learn through the medium of play.”

Headteacher Adam Cooper added: “The resources are invaluable and allow the children to develop and harness their imagination and cooperation skills through open ended play. The children just love playtime!”