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A LIMITED edition print of a breathtaking watercolour painting by a successful local artist has gone on show at Dorman Museum as part of Local History Month and to mark the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo (June 18, 1815).

‘The Charge of the Scots Greys at the Battle of Waterloo’, painted by Mario Capaldi, features the Royal Scots Greys charging forward to meet the enemy in what became one of the most famous engagements of the Battle of Waterloo.

One of Capaldi’s most famous works, the painting was reproduced as the cover to the RISK military board game in the 1990s – and a good boxed set example of RISK has just been acquired by the Dorman Museum and is on display with the print.

However the painting formed just one part of a huge body of work, which included illustrations for Rupert the Bear, Disney’s Aladdin, Barbie, Roy of the Rovers and Marvel comic books.

He even illustrated Charles Dickens – his favourite author – for the New York Saturday Evening Post and a version of Harry Potter for the BBC.

Capaldi’s family relocated from Glasgow to Middlesbrough in the 1950s to run their ice-cream business, and after training at Constantine College, the town’s former College of Art (now part of Teesside University), he worked prolifically from his studio in Middlesbrough between 1959 and 2003 but died in 2004.

Phil Philo, Senior Curator at Dorman Museum, said: “We are exceptionally privileged to have Mario Capaldi’s stunning image on display at the museum as part of Middlesbrough’s Local History Month.

“It’s also a great way to play a part in the nationwide Waterloo 200 celebrations, marking the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo, while doing it in a way which keeps it relevant by drawing attention to the fantastic work of a local artist.

“The work also has an intriguing link with our area in that Capaldi used the horses of Cleveland Police based at Ormesby Hall as models for his picture.”

  • The painting will be displayed at Dorman Museum until Sunday, June 21. For more information call the Dorman Museum on 01642 813781.