Students across County Durham are using art to raise awareness of climate change and the impact it has on communities.

Six secondary schools have worked with artists from Bearpark Artists Co-Operative in Durham to produce innovative designs that are only visible when it rains.

Students from King James 1 Academy of Bishop Auckland created their installation outside of the Town Hall, joining artwork already created by students from Bishop Barrington as part of the same project.

Artists then helped the students with the application of hydrophobic spray that is used instead of paint, which means the designs are visible on the ground when it rains.

The project supports the aims of County Durham Climate Change group and the work of the Civil Contingencies Unit on raising awareness and understanding of climate change resilience issues, such as the potential for an increase in localised flooding.

Richard Hurst, sustainability education development advisor at Durham County Council said: “This project has helped raise awareness of climate change amongst the students involved as well as giving them the opportunity to take part in an innovative art project.

“All those involved have worked hard on their designs and their creations will now help others gain an understanding of the impact climate change can have on our community.”

The project has been funded through the Civil Contingencies Unit, using Regional Flood and Coastal Committee funding along with a contribution from the County Durham Sustainable Development Fund.

Other schools involved in the project are Parkside Academy in Willington, Polam Hall School in Darlington, Seaham High School and Wolsingham School.