Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 09.17.45Newcastle’s Byker Lodge Dementia Resource Centre will not close because of council budget cuts after working with local NHS partners to secure funding support.

The council had proposed to close the centre and commission the service from the independent sector as part of its plans to make £32 million savings in the next financial year.  However it has been working closely with all of its NHS partners in the city and as a result Newcastle Gateshead CCG has agreed to make a contribution to help the centre to continue pending a review of intermediate care services.

Cabinet member for Adult Care and Health, Councillor Karen Kilgour, said:  “The council and NHS partners recognise the vitally important role that Byker Lodge plays in providing care for dementia patients, keeping them safe and well and reducing demand on health services.”

“It is very clear that cuts in social care have serious consequences for the health service and it is good news that in Newcastle we have been able to have a mature joined up debate about how we can work together to safeguard services that reduce demand for hospital health care that is often unnecessary.”

“We will continue with the whole system review of intermediate care with our health partners, Byker Lodge alongside our other services will be a part of this ongoing review.”

Mark Adams, Chief Officer from the Newcastle Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “Byker Lodge is a highly regarded service that provides really important support to dementia patients. If that support is not available, with no alternative services in our community, then there is a real risk that patients will end up requiring crisis treatment and care from hospital based services.

“Simply this is not the best care for these patients and creates added pressure for our hospitals treating those patients requiring more complex care.  When patients do not require hospital care, it is right that we look to care for them as close to their home as possible, not only from an economic perspective but equally important, from a patient care perspective.”