When one mentions the entertainment industry, most people would think about music and films. Many people watch the Oscars, Golden Globes, Grammys, MTV Video Music Awards, etc. Of course, there is a lot of appeal and glamour in the music and film industries. But would you be surprised to learn that these two are not the top-grossing sectors in entertainment? In fact, these two put together do not even match half the revenue the video game industry is earning. According to the latest numbers, the video game business is now larger than both the music and movie industries combined, making it a major industry in entertainment.

Gaming took to the mainstream with the release of Smartphone’s. The core gaming demographic has shifted from teenagers and young adults to people of all ages. Smartphone gamers are mostly casual gamers. They are people who spend a small part of their time playing video games and find enjoyment in smaller and simple games in which they don’t require investing a lot of time. Smartphone’s have shown that there is a large demand for mobile games and the number of people playing is still growing. When it comes to mobile phones, online games are the most played type of game, especially free slots games. While gaming is a medium that can help you relax, it also involves a bit of implication on the player’s part. Watching a movie or listening to music is most of the time a passive activity, while video games engage your mind in problem-solving and decision-making activities in the virtual space.

Gaming successes have been growing in the U.S. for a while, but one of the bigger reasons for this achievement is the massive growth of gaming for developed countries and their audiences. For the past several years, video games in India and China have experienced a growth rate of approximately 14% annually, year after year. And while it certainly didn’t do everything by itself, the rise of PUBG and Fortnite: Battle Royale has contributed to this statistic, alongside other tremendous gaming successes such as God Of War and Grand Theft Auto V; That last title, in particular, sold upwards of 100 million copies, which is more success than any single move has ever had in history.

Gaming has certainly come a long way in the past twenty years or so. It’s becoming more and more acceptable to identify as a “gamer”, a phrase that might have garnered many an odd look in the past. But despite its widespread popularity, gaming certainly doesn’t feel as popular as mainstream movies or TV shows. This might be due to the fact that movies and TV shows are inherently social events that require people to gather around at a specific time in order to catch their favorite show or piece of cinema. Or, it may just be that those who are most invested in gaming have not yet aged out previous generations to a degree that gaming begins to feel like anything more than an underground hobby.

But unless market trends change significantly in the next few years and the gaming hobby falls off the map completely for one reason or another, it looks like this new hierarchy of entertainment mediums is here to stay.