A TALENTED young RGS scientist has been invited to talk with politicians in the House of Lords about his thoughts on climate change following his success in a major international science competition.

Milo Smith won the runners-up award in the Royal College of Science Union challenge, which attracts entries from all over the world and is judged by eminent scientists including Lord Robert Winston.

As well as being presented with a trophy at a glittering awards ceremony held in London’s magnificent Royal Institution, 16-year-old Milo has been invited to meet politicians during a tour of the House of Lords with fertility expert Lord Winston on May 11.

In his entry, Milo argued: “The hesitance of global leaders to act upon climate change – whether due to economic incentives or scepticism in their voting base – makes it far less likely that the devastating ecological or economic effects of climate change will be mitigated before it is too late.”

The competition, run by Imperial College, London, asks students to demonstrate their skills in debate and reasoning to communicate science in an engaging, concise and creative manner.

The RCSU Science Challenge is designed provoke thought amongst scientists of the future regarding the problems affecting society and how can they use science to help resolve them.

Milo’s prize-winning essay was based on a question posed by Lord Winston: ‘Why are so many citizens reluctant to accept that the Earth’s climate appears to be changing? Should scientists be worried by this?’

It was judged by Lord Wilson and other world-leading academics including climate science expert Dr Paulo Cepi, British physicist Prof Kathy Sykes and chemist Prof Richard Templer.

The lower sixth form student, from Knaresborough, who hopes to study physics at Imperial College or the University of Cambridge, said he was overjoyed to receive an award.

Studying maths, chemistry and physics at A-level, he added: “The awards ceremony was amazing as it was held in the Royal Institution lecture theatre, which is of huge scientific importance in the UK, and two guest speakers spoke on climate.”